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The Informative Thread


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#41 Highway Man

Posted 27 June 2019 - 10:58 AM


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#42 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 17 July 2019 - 03:17 AM



#43 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 18 July 2019 - 04:11 AM


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#44 Wasabi®

Posted 18 July 2019 - 08:14 AM

That looks delicious actually. Some wasabi would make it even better!



#45 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 21 July 2019 - 03:44 AM

A multi part informative video of going to the moon

 

Part I

 


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#46 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 25 July 2019 - 09:19 AM


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#47 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 08 August 2019 - 11:48 AM


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#48 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 26 September 2019 - 02:15 PM

 

 

I can tell you this explanation makes it doable =)



#49 Rubulator

Posted 26 September 2019 - 03:09 PM

It makes a nice paper weight... Or, garbage bag topper....


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#50 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 28 September 2019 - 10:53 AM


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#51 Highway Man

Posted 02 October 2019 - 09:40 AM

800px-Texas_Flag_Come_and_Take_It.svg.pn

The Battle of Gonzales was the first military engagement of the Texas Revolution. It was fought near Gonzales, Texas, on October 2, 1835, between rebellious Texian settlers and a detachment of Mexican army soldiers.

In 1831, Mexican authorities lent the settlers of Gonzales a small cannon to help protect them from frequent Comanche raids. Over the next four years, the political situation in Mexico deteriorated, and in 1835 several states revolted. As the unrest spread, Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, the commander of all Mexican troops in Texas, felt it unwise to leave the residents of Gonzales with a weapon and requested the return of the cannon.

When the initial request was refused, Ugartechea sent 100 dragoons to retrieve the cannon. The soldiers neared Gonzales on September 29, but the colonists used a variety of excuses to keep them from the town, while secretly sending messengers to request assistance from nearby communities. Within two days, up to 140 Texians gathered in Gonzales, all determined not to give up the cannon. On October 1, settlers voted to initiate a fight. Mexican soldiers opened fire as Texians approached their camp in the early hours of October 2. After several hours of desultory firing, the Mexican soldiers withdrew.

Although the skirmish had little military significance, it marked a clear break between the colonists and the Mexican government and is considered to have been the start of the Texas Revolution. News of the skirmish spread throughout the United States, where it was often referred to as the "Lexington of Texas". The cannon's fate is disputed. It may have been buried and rediscovered in 1936, or it may have been seized by Mexican troops after the Battle of the Alamo.
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#52 Spare Parts

Posted 02 October 2019 - 12:32 PM

800px-Texas_Flag_Come_and_Take_It.svg.pn

The Battle of Gonzales was the first military engagement of the Texas Revolution. It was fought near Gonzales, Texas, on October 2, 1835, between rebellious Texian settlers and a detachment of Mexican army soldiers.

In 1831, Mexican authorities lent the settlers of Gonzales a small cannon to help protect them from frequent Comanche raids. Over the next four years, the political situation in Mexico deteriorated, and in 1835 several states revolted. As the unrest spread, Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, the commander of all Mexican troops in Texas, felt it unwise to leave the residents of Gonzales with a weapon and requested the return of the cannon.

When the initial request was refused, Ugartechea sent 100 dragoons to retrieve the cannon. The soldiers neared Gonzales on September 29, but the colonists used a variety of excuses to keep them from the town, while secretly sending messengers to request assistance from nearby communities. Within two days, up to 140 Texians gathered in Gonzales, all determined not to give up the cannon. On October 1, settlers voted to initiate a fight. Mexican soldiers opened fire as Texians approached their camp in the early hours of October 2. After several hours of desultory firing, the Mexican soldiers withdrew.

Although the skirmish had little military significance, it marked a clear break between the colonists and the Mexican government and is considered to have been the start of the Texas Revolution. News of the skirmish spread throughout the United States, where it was often referred to as the "Lexington of Texas". The cannon's fate is disputed. It may have been buried and rediscovered in 1936, or it may have been seized by Mexican troops after the Battle of the Alamo.

"Lent them a cannon".  Sounds like Texans might be thieves.


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#53 Highway Man

Posted 02 October 2019 - 12:55 PM

800px-Texas_Flag_Come_and_Take_It.svg.pn
The Battle of Gonzales was the first military engagement of the Texas Revolution. It was fought near Gonzales, Texas, on October 2, 1835, between rebellious Texian settlers and a detachment of Mexican army soldiers.
In 1831, Mexican authorities lent the settlers of Gonzales a small cannon to help protect them from frequent Comanche raids. Over the next four years, the political situation in Mexico deteriorated, and in 1835 several states revolted. As the unrest spread, Colonel Domingo de Ugartechea, the commander of all Mexican troops in Texas, felt it unwise to leave the residents of Gonzales with a weapon and requested the return of the cannon.
When the initial request was refused, Ugartechea sent 100 dragoons to retrieve the cannon. The soldiers neared Gonzales on September 29, but the colonists used a variety of excuses to keep them from the town, while secretly sending messengers to request assistance from nearby communities. Within two days, up to 140 Texians gathered in Gonzales, all determined not to give up the cannon. On October 1, settlers voted to initiate a fight. Mexican soldiers opened fire as Texians approached their camp in the early hours of October 2. After several hours of desultory firing, the Mexican soldiers withdrew.
Although the skirmish had little military significance, it marked a clear break between the colonists and the Mexican government and is considered to have been the start of the Texas Revolution. News of the skirmish spread throughout the United States, where it was often referred to as the "Lexington of Texas". The cannon's fate is disputed. It may have been buried and rediscovered in 1936, or it may have been seized by Mexican troops after the Battle of the Alamo.

"Lent them a cannon".  Sounds like Texans might be thieves.
WE DON'T STEAL!!!



We borrow without the intention of returning, and try not to get caught.
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#54 Highway Man

Posted 07 October 2019 - 12:28 AM

VALVOLINE


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#55 Highway Man

Posted 07 October 2019 - 01:54 PM


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#56 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 09 October 2019 - 10:00 AM

I need one of these to kill Max with

 

 


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#57 Highway Man

Posted 09 October 2019 - 10:28 AM

1280px-Texas_Alamo_Flag.svg.png

The Battle of Goliad was the second skirmish of the Texas Revolution. In the early-morning hours of October 9, 1835, Texas settlers attacked the Mexican Army soldiers garrisoned at Presidio La Bahía, a fort near the Mexican Texas settlement of Goliad. La Bahía lay halfway between the only other large garrison of Mexican soldiers (at Presidio San Antonio de Bexar) and the then-important Texas port of Copano.
In September, Texians began plotting to kidnap Mexican General Martín Perfecto de Cos, who was en route to Goliad to attempt to quell the unrest in Texas. The plan was initially dismissed by the central committee coordinating the rebellion. However, within days of the Texian victory at the Battle of Gonzales, Captain George Collinsworth and members of the Texian militia in Matagorda began marching towards Goliad. The Texians soon learned that Cos and his men had already departed for San Antonio de Béxar but continued their march.

The garrison at La Bahía was understaffed and could not mount an effective defense of the fort's perimeter. Using axes borrowed from townspeople, Texians were able to chop through a door and enter the complex before the bulk of the soldiers were aware of their presence. After a 30-minute battle, the Mexican garrison, under Colonel Juan López Sandoval, surrendered. One Mexican soldier had been killed and three others wounded, while only one Texian had been injured. The majority of the Mexican soldiers were instructed to leave Texas, and the Texians confiscated $10,000 worth of provisions and several cannons, which they soon transported to the Texian Army for use in the Siege of Béxar. The victory isolated Cos's men in Béxar from the coast, forcing them to rely on a long overland march to request or receive reinforcements or supplies.


There go the Texans borrowing again....
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#58 Highway Man

Posted 09 October 2019 - 10:32 AM

I need one of these to kill Max with
 
 

This is the only I way I can kill max.
na_b-17_06.jpg
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#59 Captain John H. Miller

Posted 09 October 2019 - 11:42 AM

HWM, watch out for that church in the background...

 

!church



#60 Highway Man

Posted 09 October 2019 - 12:19 PM

HWM, watch out for that church in the background...
 
!church

Don't worry, I'm a gunner in that one


I say we add that to the command list :rofl:


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